Mar 262015
 

TS reminiscing about “Stern ol’ teacher Sister Ruth”.

How she didn’t mind dull sermons because she knew someone needed to hear what was being preached. I recall being shocked by that notion; I thought only in terms of me, of course, and couldn’t imagine “liking” a homily for the sake of another.

Sometimes I read something I really don’t like. Especially when it makes me see something true. I share his rebellion at the idea, but then at my own selfishness.

As they say “read the whole thing”, since his post is an excellent piece of writing (as usual). His blog Video meliora, proboque; Deteriora sequor has continued truckin’ on since 2001.

Mar 162015
 

My RSS feed is chock full of Catholic blogs, Catholic news sites, and other news sources. So often I am doing much more skimming than reading. Sampling what catches my interest. There are exceptions to this and a dozen blogs or so that I read every entry.

One example of this is Thomas L. McDonald’s God and the Machine. He writes on Catholicism, technology, gaming, history, with occasional forays into more political subjects. Often the topics he covers don’t fit into just one category but spillover. Even when his areas of interest don’t line up with my own I still find myself interested in what he has to say.

His posting today was a good indicator of the variety of his topics and the excellence of his writing regarding them.

First off there was another post in the series “How I Pray” series this time with Al Kresta. I’ve pretty much stopped listening to “talk radio” except in the case of Al Kresta’s show via podcast. So when I saw today’s entry in this series was from him I knew it would be something special and it was. One thing I so love about this series is the honesty of those who have responded. It might be an odd-encouragement to see the struggles of others in their prayer life, but it is the solidarity of those attempting to grow in holiness. I’ve learned something from each author in this series. Last week’s entry by Amy Welborn was also exceptional, but really there hasn’t been an entry that wasn’t worth reading (possibly even my own contribution).

He also writes for the National Catholic Register and his piece today on net neutrality was also exemplary. Net Neutrality Needs to Be Done the Right Way. This is a complicated subject that is not well explained as echoed via the various political divides. I have heard and read much discussed about the subject over the years with many opinions regarding this. Still what is best about this article is that it was written not just for geeks like myself, but for a more general audience – not an easy task. His conclusions concur with my own, but that’s not his fault.

Also today he posted Exorcising A Possessed Statue of The Virgin Mary and Child which is perfect linkbait for me. His posts on Catholic art history often have the bizarre and this is no exception. All I know is that if I ever need to create a costume for Halloween I will go as St. Peter Martyr.

Feb 032015
 

Entropy Academy a book by Alison Bernhof.

Entropy, the second law of thermodynamics, happens. It steals our time, brings chaos into our homes, and spreads the myth that chaos and education are mutually exclusive. Far from it!

Entropy Academy reveals how you can train your home (even a messy one) to do half your teaching, while much of the other half can be taught “Entropy style”—in the natural process of everyday life.

Marvel at the specialization of birds’ feet through your kitchen window. Recognize the musical eras as you drive. Watch logic and Venn diagrams become crystal clear in a box of random buttons. Use raisins to introduce your kindergartener to algebra. Let the pages of Entropy Academy show how, with a minimal outlay of time and money, you can leave much of the teaching to the house while you relax with a cup of tea.

Those who are currently homeschooling, considering it, or simply wish to be more involved in their child’s (or grandchild’s) education will find much to encourage, amuse, and inspire them in this account of the inner life of a highly unusual, unabashedly idiosyncratic family. Building on “Entropy style” foundations, the Bernhoft children’s successes have ranged from Stanford Phi Beta Kappa, Ivy League and aspiring Ph.D., to the son with Down’s Syndrome who is one of the best-known and most popular residents of Ojai, California, the small town the author calls home.

New video from Ascension Press for young men considering the priesthood

Along with a preview of their upcoming video Altaration: The Myster of the Mass Revealed

Here is an interview of Dawn Eden from Matt C. Abbott. Dawn has recently released a Catholic version of her book “Thrill of the Chaste.”

An excerpt:

Dawn Eden: For several years, I had been wanting to revise The Thrill of the Chaste, because my understanding of chastity – especially its relationship to Christian joy – had deepened since I became a Catholic. I especially wanted to make the book accessible to men, as the first edition was directed at women, and many male readers had told me they needed a book like it for them.

When I wrote the original edition of The Thrill of the Chaste in 2005, I was Protestant – having converted as an adult from Judaism – and was preparing to enter the Church. My life before my conversion to Christianity was pretty typical for an unmarried rock journalist from New York City, so my new walk forced me to make some serious changes.

Initially, it was hard for me to discern how living chastely could be compatible with Christian joy. I looked for a book to guide me, but all I could find were books on teen purity – which were not exactly relevant for a 31-year-old woman.

That is why, after a few years of learning how to find meaning and happiness in my new way of life, I wrote The Thrill of the Chaste. It is the kind of book I wished had been there when I needed it.

Today, having been Catholic for nine years, I can hardly believe that I managed to be joyfully chaste without the benefit of Confirmation, the Eucharist, Confession, and the whole life of the Church.

Being a member of the Mystical Body of Christ, and receiving Jesus’ own Body and Blood in the Eucharist, has given me a deeper understanding of the meaning of being embodied. I see more clearly how chastity enables one to love fully in each relationship, in the way that is appropriate to the type of relationship and to one’s state of life.

Chastity is not just for singles; in marriage, it enables couples to grow together in freely willed, total, faithful, and fruitful love. For that reason, I wanted to make the new Catholic edition of The Thrill of the Chaste relevant for men and women, whether they are discerning marriage or a celibate vocation, and that is what I have done.

Nov 262014
 

Via Brandon Vogt:

This morning Fr. Robert Barron launched AdventReflections.com, a place where people can sign up to receive FREE daily reflections throughout Advent.

Each day, from November 30 until Christmas Eve (December 24), Fr. Barron will email a short reflection on an Advent theme, in either English or Spanish (your choice!). In addition, subscribers receive exclusive videos not found anywhere else,** special discount codes** for new products, and several giveaways throughout Advent including DVDs, CDs, signed books, and more. The best part? It’s totally FREE!

Sign-up now at AdventReflections.com.

Also Amy Welborn has a new Avent devotional out. Prepare Him Room: Advent Family Devotions. Kindle version is a steal at .99! I super enjoyed her Lenten devotional and so look forward to reading this one.

Oct 292014
 

Maureen aka suburbanbanshee posts Worst Vatican Translation Yet at # Over the Rhine and Into the Tiber

On October 27th, Pope Francis addressed the Pontifical Academy of Sciences and talked about evolution as one of God’s probable methods of Creation. News reports in English had the Pope saying, “God is not a divine being.”

What the Pope actually said was, “….Dio non è un demiurgo….” which is the Italian for “God is not a demiurge.”

In heretical Gnostic theology, the creator of the material universe was an evil or depressed lesser being called the Demiurge [Builder] who was often identified with Satan, whereas God was a higher being (or beings, or eight beings, or….) who never wanted matter created at all. Christian Gnostics justified this term (like many others they used) because it was used once in the Bible in Hebrews 11:10 – “For [Abraham] looked for a city that has foundations, the Architect and Builder of which is God.” (Of course St. Paul didn’t mean it like they meant it.)

So yeah, maybe some of you will believe me now about the pathetic inaccuracy of the current Vatican English translations.

I do have to wonder if the English translator is a native English speaker or not since there have been so many egregious translations. Is there even a team that cross-checks translatons? I would not be surprised at all to find out there isn’t.

Her primary blog is Aliens in This World which covers a cornucopia of topics and has been a long-time favorite of mine.

Aug 212014
 

I have complained in the past just how aesthetically awful so many Catholic websites are. There has certainly been progress, but most parish websites seem to have a design ethic older than the Church.

So it is with some pleasure to point out a site that is beautiful, easy to navigate, and renders nicely in multiple resolutions.

So thumbs way up for the new Word on Fire site.

Now maybe we should have a prayer campaign for the Vatican’s web designer(s).

Aug 212014
 

Via Rich at  Over the Rhine and Into the Tiber with “Kick the Bucket”

The Archdiocese of Cincinnati is discouraging its employees from taking the ice bucket challenge for the ALS Association over the group’s embrace of embryonic stem cell research. Instead, would-be bucketeers should send donations to the John Paul II Medical Research Institute. Here’s a snippet from the Cincinnati Enquirer’s story:

“We appreciate the compassion that has caused so many people to engage in this,” Andriacco said. “But it’s a well established moral principle that a good end is not enough. The means to that ends must be morally licit.”

An embryo must be destroyed to harvest its stem cells, Andriacco said. Many Catholics relate that to abortion.

The Archdiocese asks that any money raised is sent instead to the John Paul II Medical Research Institute in Iowa City, Iowa, where the research is only conducted using adult stem cells.

Rigg and Tom Otten, principal of Elder High School, plan to take the ice-bucket challenge — for the research institute — Thursday morning at Elder, Andriacco said.

The idea behind this campaign is rather brilliant. Appeal first to the vanity of celebrities to get the ball rolling and than the vanity of others as they post their own YouTube videos of this. This is selfie charity.

So much for not letting your left hand know what your right hand is doing, since that can never go viral. Add a bit of shaming to get others to follow and you have a nicely crafted campaign that so far has raised over 40 million dollars. Even if the ALS Association supported totally ethical research, selfie charity is still unfortunate. The mixture of imposed penance, doing something good, broadcasting your penance for the cause, and then the chain-letter aspect of getting others to join in is perfect in a Madison Avenue sense, but otherwise unfortunate. Just wonder how this will escalate with other charitable causes? We have already seen the Fire Challenge, what’s next?

John Paul II Medical Research Institute, Donation page

On the funny side of this:

Barren, Minnesota: Inspired by a viral charity challenge that involves achieving a monetary goal and ice buckets, the St. Bartholomew youth group issued a “boiling bucket of glop” challenge: donate or collect donations of $100 to their Fall mission trip to Appalachia, and one of the youth group members will get dunked with a boiling bucket of glop. They earned $3.27. …

You’ve seen all the USCCB Sword Swallowing Challenge videos by now. Everyone from Catholic celebrities like The Curt Jester writer Jeff Miller, Fr. Robert Barron, and Jeff Cavins, to your friends have posted videos of themselves slowly dropping swords down their throats to help raise money for the USCCB. …

Thanks Eye of the Tiber, if I am a Catholic celebrity I am suddenly being tempted towards selfie charity. Where is my web cam and YouTube account?

Aug 052014
 

So who is the geekiest Catholic Apologist? No doubt it is Catholic Answer’s Jimmy Akin who has just released a new blog Let’s Watch Doctor Who! subtitled “Reviewing every Doctor Who TV story … from the beginning!

Now I just love cheesy SF and this creates a good excuse to watch the series from the start. Besides I have exhausted all the episodes of Mystery Science Theater 3000 available for streaming on Netflix. Fortunately most of the episodes of Dr. Who are available for streaming on Netflix, except part of the first season. Although I ordered the DVDs of it and now have it for viewing.

In one of those strange coincidences I happened to see this image for the first time today.

William Hartnell was the first Dr. Who and of course St. John Vianney’s feast day was yesterday.

Aug 052014
 

SF Author John C. Wright was asked to write an essay for the new First Peter Five explaining how his faith influenced his science fiction writing.

Few men have ever hated Christ as much as I have, before turning to love Him. Before I was a Catholic, I was an atheist, and not an atheist who kept his opinions to himself, but a vituperative, proselytizing, aggressive, evangelist of atheism who sought at every opportunity to spread the Bad News that God was dead and Christians were fools.

There is much to be enjoyed in this essay, but I really liked this point.

I wrote stories with nakedly religious endings of pure hope when I was an atheist because the story logic required such an ending. Likewise, I wrote stories with a nakedly atheist ending of pure despair when I was a Christian because the story logic required such an ending.

Such an excellent point especially since message fiction is getting so prevalent in science fiction. Agenda before story which can never go right.

In other John C. Wright news, he announced today that Tor Books has agreed to publish the remaining books in the Count to the Eschaton Sequence. Great news as I have read an enjoyed the first three books and await “The Architect of Aeons” to be released next year. So it is good to know that the full series will be published.

So I commend Tor Books for doing this. Now if only they would stop the message fiction outbursts on their blog and the stupidity of topics like “Post-Binary Gender in SF.”